All posts, Culture and buildings

Going Underground – Granada’s Metro ‘opens’

We say ‘open’ but not in the sense you can travel on it [Update: New opening date planned for June 2017]. From its first planning stages in 2002, today, the steel shutters of Recogidas metro station – on one of central Granada’s main thoroughfares – were rolled up, the lights turned on and a steady procession of soon-to-be travellers and tourists descended into what, at first sight, seemed to be a cross between a lap dancing club and a Muse concert. And there was music – the type that people sit cross-legged to next to a fountain. Whether this music will be part of the travelling experience, we’ll have to see. Today, it was just a neon glimpse of what’s to come.

But what an amazing station! We asked, but were none the wiser, about costs of travel and whether buskers playing ‘Calles de Granada‘ will be allowed, but the whole route – stretching 16km from Armilla to Albolete, via 26 stops in around 48 minutes, is due to open ‘by the end of the year‘ (we’ve heard that one before). The trains will be air-conditioned, have security systems, video surveillance and will be a very smooth ride.

granada_metro_platform

S almost demolished the state-of-the-art ticket machine (five languages available) by ‘pressing’ the touch screen (clearly just a display model just to wind everybody up) before the escalators took you down onto the platforms. Above, a film played of the view of the countryside from the train’s window.

In the dim light filming was a hazard as the edge of the platform and track wasn’t that easy to spot. Unlike London’s Jubilee Line – with its open and close platform doors – safety measures were hard to spot.

granada_metro_sign

The route was chosen (see photo) to pass the ‘main centers of leisure, work and social interest with stops in Polígono de Juncaril, Fuentenueva, the neighborhood of Zaidin, and the Technology Park.’ There are also stops at the Sierra Nevada shopping complex and both Granada’s train and bus stations, so that’s fab. The city’s students will also be pleased as the route passes the main university buildings.

It was like a mini-version of London’s Westminster station taken over by a West End show producer. There were no trains to view or vending machines with stuck euros in their slots – not even a pigeon. But we can’t wait to return once Metropolitano de Granada opens. Judging by the leaflet the trains are green and driven by people with beards.

We’ll update this post once it’s properly open (and closed again after someone has fallen in front of a train). Here are some more photos and our short, juddery video.

granada_metro_platform1

granada_metro_route

granada_metro_entrada

Related posts:

The pomegranate city – Granada

Granada junk shops

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Discussion

7 thoughts on “Going Underground – Granada’s Metro ‘opens’

  1. Terrific! This is great news. I really must live under a stone because I had no idea the underground was even being built! Please keep us posted – I can’t wait to play on it 🙂

    Posted by Lottie Nevin | April 16, 2016, 8:33 am
  2. Very similar to the new one in Malaga!

    Posted by Wendy Kate | April 16, 2016, 10:30 am
    • We’ve yet to travel on the Málaga version – will try it out next time we are there. Did they have a ‘free’ day of travel for people, so they could get used to it?

      Posted by con jamón spain | April 16, 2016, 12:06 pm
      • I am not sure. We went on it to get to the Russian art gallery, as that seemed the best way. It was all brand spanking new and very nice! We struggled with the ticket machine though….

        Posted by Wendy Kate | April 16, 2016, 12:17 pm
  3. They had a free day in Malaga – in the middle of winter. The metro’s great, you can get anywhere very quickly. It’s very fast, regular and punctual, smooth, clean, joyful. Still looks brand new. Hope it stays that way.

    Posted by The Seas Of Mintaka | September 8, 2016, 2:54 am
  4. Need to know when this opens in Granada

    Posted by atdebailleul@gmail.com | October 9, 2016, 5:05 pm

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