All posts, Órgiva and environs

Santa Claws

Spotted today, this advert seems to suggest that a puppy (bearing in mind the timing) would make a perfect Christmas gift.

What the advert says, we hope, is that the puppies are free – a gift of sorts. If so, at least someone is finding them a home. But let’s hope someone doesn’t give one to a child, if its only purpose is to entertain them for a week or two.

We both grew up on advertisements saying: ‘A dog is for life, not just for Christmas‘ – a slogan created in 1978 by Clarissa Baldwin, then head of PR but now the CEO of the Dogs Trust in the UK.

Puppy advert

Puppy Love?

Órgiva is full of dogs. Puppies appear as if on an airport baggage carousel. We see dogs that are chained up, or roaming, unloved.

We’ve even heard there’s a man who shoots dogs that bark too much at night near his home (try doing that in southeast London, big boy).

Of course, many are looked after and part of the family, but some are ‘working dogs’ raised to be aggressive towards people and bark when they come near – guard dogs outside homes with nothing worth stealing. And when they have no useful purpose, they’re booted out.

At the vet, someone brought in a dog who’d been beaten and abandoned. With little money, his friends had clubbed together to get it treatment.

A while back we climbed a fence to relieve a dog of a tangled chain around its neck. The dog couldn’t even bark it was so tight. It had no water either. We bought it a proper collar, longer lead, some decent food and a whopping bone ( a Big Mac in the dog world). A tiny thing, but better than nothing. The bastard owner was probably a bit confused.

All these dogs need decent care and when they don’t find it amazing charities like Paws for Thought and Animals In Distress try and step in.

One day, we’ll pay them a visit.

© con jamón spain

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Discussion

5 thoughts on “Santa Claws

  1. There’s quite a different attitudes to animals here… a friend of mine recently conveyed her genuine bafflement over some friends of hers who bought their cats scratch posts and a climbing frame, as if she’d never even known these things even existed. She was equally bemused of an acquaintance of hers taking their guinea pig, which had injured its leg, to the vet.

    However, many love and care for their pets just as much as most people do in the UK or Germany.

    Posted by ladyofthecakes | December 12, 2013, 7:31 pm
    • Of course – we have the much-loved Shakey the dog around town, to name but one. It’s just you don’t see nearly as many dogs chained up here as at home. A dog down the lane never leaves his ‘post’. Horses – that’s another story for another day.

      Posted by con jamón spain | December 12, 2013, 7:40 pm
      • I can’t cope with the concept of chained up dogs 😦
        When I was a kid, we had some of those in the village, as well, but that’s no longer the case nowadays.

        Posted by ladyofthecakes | December 12, 2013, 11:35 pm
  2. In Croatia, I used to see dogs chained and without water exposed to the ( summer ) midday sun while the owners were out all day… I wish I’d done what you did!

    Posted by sew2pro | December 16, 2013, 10:20 am
    • When people have complained in the past (we’ve been told) the response is often “It’s the same in ‘your’ country, just more hidden”. How true this, who knows. In the summer we saw several horses in blazing sun with no shade and seemingly no water.

      Posted by con jamón spain | December 16, 2013, 1:50 pm

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